Smart Logistics

Smart Logistics

Tom van Woensel
Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR

Logistics can be defined as efficient and cost-effective managerial decisions related to the design, planning and control of the supply chain processes. Smart Logistics approaches this in a smart way, which means that planning and scheduling, ICT infrastructure, people and governmental policymaking need to be efficiently and effectively aligned. Smart Logistics equals 3P+I (i.e. Planning, People, Policy and Infrastructure), and is the synchronized interplay of these four key domains.

Relevance

A number of ongoing economic, societal and environmental developments indicate a challenging future and therefore the importance of Smart Logistics. The transport industry represents an important part of the economy, since it accounts for about 5% of the GDP within the EU. EU projections show a growth of 25% between 2010 and 2030 for freight transport by road, rail and water combined. Furthermore urbanization takes place at high pace. Cities are challenged by this growth and need to control good flows within urban areas to reduce the adverse impact on living conditions (congestion, pollution, etc.).

Key Topics

The Transportation Chain consists of three parts: the Pickup Chain (or the first mile), the Transit Chain and the Delivery Chain (or the last mile). The Lab’s research in Smart Logistics is completely embedded in the Transportation Chain, working on topics related to separate parts of the chain, and on the integration of the separate parts.

The challenges in the Transportation Chain are to efficiently handle increased uncertainty and high complexity. This is important since the real-life world does not fit into a deterministic and static straitjacket, which is assumed by so many published models and industry tools. Any decision, action, plan or schedule built on unrealistic assumptions is bound to be less than optimal once realized. This is a key starting point in all our research. Important new research areas emerge with a focus on the ability to adequately represent real-life environments. Efficiently coping with these rich models is an important and challenging problem both in real-life and academic environments. This research outline builds extensively on the vast and sound foundations of academic literature and industrial experience.

Achievements

Companies are our laboratories and are key to the success of this Lab. Specifically, ongoing long-term research and project work takes place at Eyefreight, Nabuurs, Kuehne+Nagel, Brabant Intermodal, Connexxion, FloraHolland, Lekkerland, VGB, Bausch and Lomb, TomTom and many more. The Smart Logistics Lab was involved in securing over 5 million in grants (including Dinalog, Transumo, NWO and company gifts). Of this amount, over 1 million euro was allocated to the TU/e, mainly to hire PhD students.

For more information about the smart logistics lab visit our lab website.

Gregor Brandt
PhD Student
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Fardin Dashty Saridarq
PhD Student
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Ton de Kok
Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Nico Dellaert
Associate Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Noud Gademann
Assistant Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Vincent Karels
PhD Student
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Afonso Sampaio Oliveira
PhD Student
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Marco Slikker
Associate Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Tom van Woensel
Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR
Luuk Veelenturf
Assistant Professor
SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR

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Our lab is involved in a number of (in-company) graduation projects of Bachelor and Master students. Some interesting, recently performed projects are:

Currently our lab is involved in the following (joint) research & development projects. These projects are usually conducted in collaboration with other universities and companies. Contact our us if you are interested in teaming up for a new project proposal.

  • The Eyefreight product allows organizations to easily plan and monitor their logistics flows and process its administration automatically. One of the positive effects is that a company-wide overview of the transportation flows is created. Eyefreight wants to be ahead in providing algorithms making Eyefreight suitable for converting intended optimizations to tangible results in daily practice. ...
  • The Dutch ornamental plant cultivation industry operates at world-class level and functions as the centre for trade with the whole of Europe. Technological developments are leading to a more virtualized world. Da Vinc3i is investigating how the Dutch ornamental plant cultivation industry in the virtual trade network can reinforce its leading competitive position in worldwide ...
  • A growing logistics problem is the supply of various retail stores in the Dutch city centers. Parties with all sorts of interests are involved here. Municipalities want their city centers to be low on traffic and keep the inconvenience from trucks to a minimum for the shopping public. Stores no longer want stock, but the ...
  • This challenging project is an initiative of Modint: the retail-supplier organization with around 800 members, representing ca. 75% of the Dutch fashion and textile sector and a total freight budget of over 1 billion Euro. Cities are more and more congested due to an overload of (freight) transport movements. On a daily base, individual shops ...
  • Due to the conventional and hierarchical way in which the supply chain of the automotive aftermarket is organized and has been governed for many decades, this market is unable to adapt to the challenges of today. The objective of the project IZI Motive is to successfully demonstrate a new and innovative logistic 4C concept in ...